Pfaltzgraff Napoli Small Canister and Lid

Pfaltzgraff Napoli Small Canister and Lid

$28.79

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Pfaltzgraff Napoli Small Canister and Lid

6 3/4 in

Used Very Good Condition

Napoli dinnerware is a subtly decorated, hand-painted collection that evokes the light and colors of the coast of Italy. The soft palette of pale orange, yellow, rose, varying shades of blue and light green creates a bright, cheerful setting for any meal. Each piece in Napoli’s broad range of items is individually styled, yet the entire collection works together through the repetition of an elegant vine motif and whimsical hand-painted floral rendering

Pfaltzgraff Pottery was founded in 1811 by German potters in Pennsylania. In the early 1960’s, the business was renamed The Pfaltzgraff Company. And in 1967, the company introduced Yorktowne – considered to be the top selling table top pattern in history. The design of a blue flower on a gray background was borrowed from Pfaltzgraff’s 19th Century salt-glazed stoneware. At that time, salt-glazed stoneware was decorated using characteristic cobalt blue slip, a mixture of liquefied clay and cobalt pigment that could be brushed or stenciled onto the pieces in a variety of designs or labels. Because the decoration liquid was made of the same clay as the ware, during firing it would become part of the body of the piece insuring that it would not fade or wear off. Yorktowne’s pattern was based on these salt glazed, cobalt slip designs. Yorktowne continues to be manufactured today, however it is no longer made in the United States. In 2005 the company was sold to Lifetime Brands, and Yorktowne as well as the other Pfaltzgraff patterns, are now manufactured overseas. The last American made Yorktowne was manufactured in October 2005.

Weight 5 lbs
Dimensions 8 × 8 × 6 in
Brand

Pfaltzgraff

Collection

Napoli

Item Type

Canisters, Small Canister

Material

Stoneware

Color

Green, Orange, Yellow

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